There’s much to explore in kitchen cabinet hardware

You’ve decided to go with the classic Shaker design for your kitchen cabinets. You can’t go wrong, it’s long enduring construction has all but defied going out of style. Surely part of the reason for the lasting popularity is the stylistic flexibility of the Shakers. They can become traditional or modern, depending on how you choose to work with them.

When dealing with elements such as lighting and tile, you are essentially choosing the course for which style your kitchen will adapt. Hardware, for instance, may have a profound influence on the overall look of the space. Think of it as jewelry chosen to compliment an outfit, done tastefully, a stunning ensemble will emerge.

Since Shakers are known and appreciated for their simplicity, they work well with unadorned hardware. It’s a credit to their versatility; they fit either vintage or modern motifs. In the case of vintage white Shaker cabinets, a combination of timeless cup or bin pulls or knobs are often used. Typically, the knobs will be on the doors and the bin pulls on the drawers. If a drawer is larger than 30” wide, two bull pins are necessary.

vintage-style-glass

Yet another popular hardware choice for Shaker cabinets is that of vintage-style glass. It creates a nice contrast between a stained cabinet finish when using a white glass knob. For an additional vintage touch, attach the knobs to the drawers (though pulls are much more common in today’s use). But if a special theme is desired, say Victorian or Colonial, they are perfect, especially with teamed with glass-front hutch or stained wood cabinets, subway tile or black and white kitchens.

vintage-pulls

Vintage pulls are so popular there are modern versions of them made with faux screws actually molded to the piece! Of course, you can seek out original pulls with the real screws if authenticity is important. They add a great antique feel to the space that also appears to be of the industrial world. For a completely different look, simply choose a different finish; from either nickel, oil rubbed bronze or antique brass. They feature well in a subway tile environment and add a nice touch when items such as stainless steel countertops, commercial style appliances, farm sinks and industrial style lighting are also present.

tubular-bar-pulls

{Picture reference from Houzz}

Typically found on slab or flat-panel doors, stainless steel tubular bar pulls are also a great choice for Shakers. They are also referred to as “barrel pulls” and can be found in the nickel variety as well. They come in long and short varieties, depending on taste ranges from classic to dramatic. Ultimately it’s the modern image they provide for which they are most often used. Especially with mosaic tiles of all sizes, ebony stained Shakers and modern pendant lighting, tubular bar pulls are the stuff of exceptional contemporary taste.

Flat-Bar-Pulls For a somewhat glamorous approach, flat bar pulls transform the overall setting. With its nickel, stainless steel or hand-forged white bronze finish and emphasized length you’ll get the kind of contemporary edge that interior designers are paid the big bucks to create! By simply combining them with white or dark Shaker cabinets, stone or concrete countertops, full height glass backsplashes or oversized tiles, you can accomplish the same quality design work yourself!

wire-pull For a traditional look that compliments crown molding, plate racks, bronze accents and Shaker cabinets, accented wire pulls are ideal. Essentially of the wire pull functional design they have decorative details that can be associated with antique and even Victorian flavor (especially in a bronze finish) that instantly adds class to any kitchen.

footed-panels If a truly classic look is desired, arced and footed panels are just the medicine. Also made in the wire pull variety, they are conservatively decorative (in other words, perfect for a Shaker cabinet). In order to prevent a visually stagnant vibe, mix dark and light cabinet finishes creating a contrast. Best when used with stone mosaic tile backsplashes, nickel diamond mesh cabinet inserts, and marble countertops with the classic sloped ogee edge.

Don’t be intimidated by the notion of mixing the finishes of the wood and its corresponding hardware. It’s all about originality. Replacing the hardware alone will create an all new look. There are no rules, you don’t need a certain fixture to match a specific finish. Not everything must match. Perhaps you want to be outrageous and eye catching, or you may prefer to be elegantly under-the-radar. Since the cabinet hardware is often the final touch of sorts, it’s also a bit of a last word – it defines the style of the room.